How Does Deviated Septum Surgery Work?

Septoplasty, the correction of a deviated septum, is the most common ear, neck, and throat (ENT) surgery among American adults. 

About 70% to 80% of people have a deviated septum, but most don’t show any symptoms. 

A deviated septum occurs when the bone and cartilage that divide your nose in half, known as the nasal septum, becomes crooked. When one nasal cavity is smaller than the other, breathing is more difficult. 

Patients who have a more severe deviated septum may experience sleep problems, postnasal drip, and frequent sinus infections and headaches. 

Aside from affecting your nose’s ability to function, a deviated septum can also affect its appearance. Often, septoplasty is paired with rhinoplasty to correct not only the nasal obstruction, but also the appearance of the nose. 

If you want to learn more about how deviated septum surgery works and whether it could address your issues, this short guide by Dr. Robert A. Guida, who practices in New York City and Staten Island, New York, will help. 

How we fix a deviated septum

During a septoplasty, Dr. Guida makes a small incision inside your nose to reshape the septum

and remove any extra bone. This straightens the septum, enabling you to breathe freely, and it also improves the aesthetics of your nose.

The procedure lasts about an hour, and it’s done on an outpatient basis. All you need is a friend or relative to drive you home after surgery. 

Both local and general anesthesia can be used, although general anesthesia is usually recommended.

Smooth recovery with no visible scars 

Dr. Guida performs deviated septum surgery without making any external incisions. This means that the small scar from the surgery is hidden inside your nose. 

Although swelling and bruising are common, these symptoms go away quickly with rest and an ice pack. You may also experience some bleeding, but this is a normal part of the recovery process. 

If you feel any pain after the procedure, you’ll receive prescription painkillers.

Depending on the physical demands of your job, you should be able to go back to work within one week. Within two months, you’ll be fully recovered. 

Learn more about how you can get rid of your symptoms 

Studies show that septoplasty can greatly improve, and in some cases eliminate, the symptoms of a deviated septum. 

Many patients are satisfied with the new look of their nose following deviated septum surgery. To get an idea of what the final result may look like, check our before and after photo gallery.

If you suspect you have a deviated septum and want to correct it, don’t hesitate to contact us to schedule an appointment and get expert advice on your next step.

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